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What the Bible says about Jesus Christ's Authority
(From Forerunner Commentary)

Matthew 14:13-21

Christ's miracle of feeding the five thousand is unique in that it is the only one that all four gospel writers mention (Matthew 14:13-21; Mark 6:30-44; Luke 9:10-17; John 6:1-14). It illustrates Jesus' authority over nature and His divine intervention on behalf of others, showing that He is concerned about both humans' physical and spiritual needs.

Jesus is moved with compassion at the sight of thousands of people who had made a great effort to hear His message of hope. Although He is tired after a long day, He embraces the opportunity to teach them and heal the sick among them. As evening descends, His disciples suggest that the hungry crowd be disbanded to seek necessary food from the surrounding villages, but Jesus has something else in mind.

To test Phillip's faith, He asks him how the people could be fed. Not only does Philip learn a lesson of faith, but all of the disciples learn that true faith must rely on divine resources, not physical and material ones. Phillip begins to tally all of the meager supplies the disciples had among them, and somewhat stymied, says, "Two hundred denarii worth of bread is not sufficient for them." One denari was a day's wage at the time.

Then Andrew tells Jesus, "There is a lad here who has five barley loaves and two small fish." Yet, because of their lack of faith, the disciples cannot see any possibility of feeding the great multitude with their scarce funds and the scanty food on hand. However, faith enables us to see that with the omnipotent God, all things are possible.

This miracle is a magnificent act of creative power. No amount of human reasoning can reduce this miracle to a natural phenomenon. Indeed, complete understanding of miracles is beyond human capability to understand. By an act of His own creative power, Jesus revealed proof of His deity to thousands.

Martin G. Collins
The Miracles of Jesus Christ: Feeding the Five Thousand (Part One)

Matthew 14:22-33

The heart of Christ's miracle of walking on the water (Matthew 14:22-33; Mark 6:45-52; John 6:15-21) is that of Jesus' direct control over natural law. His paradoxical action against the known laws of gravity and of the properties of liquid water did not change, suspend, or cancel these universal laws themselves; instead, it was the exercise of a stronger power. By using an analogy, Herbert Lockyer sheds light on the principle at work:

The law of gravity is not set aside when the magnet collects iron filings; it is only that the superior force of magnetism has overcome gravitation. So what happened that stormy night was the exercise of Christ's omnipotence, as He, the Creator of seas and winds revealed His authority over them, and they being His, He could use them as He desired. It was His will which bore Him triumphantly above those waters. (All the Miracles of the Bible, p. 201.)

All things are possible with the Father and Jesus Christ. To doubt that they can accomplish such things is faithlessness. One who has learned to trust in God and believe in His Word does not wonder whether God can intervene on his behalf, although he may wonder at the method or the way it is carried out.

Martin G. Collins
The Miracles of Jesus Christ: Walking On Water (Part Two)

Matthew 21:23

"These things" most specifically refers to what happened earlier in the chapter. He made His triumphal entry into the city on the back of a donkey, and the people shouted "Hosanna to the Lord!" A great multitude of people wished Him well. From there, He went into the Temple area and overturned the moneychangers' tables and disrupted those who were selling sacrificial animals. This was a direct affront to those who were in charge of the Temple and the Sanhedrin, so their question to Him is: "Who gave You the authority to do these things?"

John W. Ritenbaugh
The Sin of Self-Deception

Colossians 1:14-17

Paul is is exalting Jesus Christ, which is important to his argument, as we see in chapter 2. First, we have the gospel, where truth concerning this situation resides. He exalts Christ by using the word translated "firstborn" two different times. In one section, he emphasizes chronological preeminence: Christ was before all. The second time, he gives status preeminence: Christ was not only before all, but He also has authority over all.

John W. Ritenbaugh
The Covenants, Grace, and Law (Part Twenty)


 




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